satiate

satiate, sate, surfeit, cloy, pall, glut, gorge are comparable when they mean to fill or become filled to the point of repletion. Although both satiate and sate can imply no more than a complete satisfying, both terms more often imply an overfilling or an overfeeding so that there is no longer a pleasure in what once pleased or seemed desirable
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the ordinary Roman . . . satiated alike with the fervors of the democrats and the rigidity of the conservatives— Buchan

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I wondered even then if a few common words of explanation, a few sober words of promise, would not have satisfied the crowd, already sated with eloquence— Repplier

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so overwhelmed by information . . . that curiosity becomes sated, discrimination dulled— W. R. Parker

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Surfeit distinctly implies a fefeding or supplying to excess with consequent nausea or disgust
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surfeited herself with candy

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surfeit a person with flattery

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readers surfeited with the . . . wild overstatements and wild understatements of public dispute— Montague

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if music be the food of love, play on; give me excess of it, that, surfeiting, the appetite may sicken, and so die— Shak.

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Cloy stresses the resulting disgust or boredom more than the surfeit which induces them
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and thus, with sinning cloyed, has died each Murgatroyd— Gilbert

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poetic wit itself is a rarity .... Large indiscriminate doses of it tend to cloyHorace Gregory

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Pall differs from cloy only in its greater emphasis upon the loss of all power in something with which one is surfeited to challenge one's interest or attention or to whet one's appetite; the term therefore refers rather to things that tend to satiate than to the persons whose appetites or desifes have been sated by such things
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there anguish does not sting; nor pleasure pallKeats

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common sense does pall on a husband sometimes— Deland

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at that point the scene begins to pall and the senses dull. Defeat. . . can be as monotonous as tropical rain—5. L. A. Marshall

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Glut, like surfeit, implies excess in feeding or supplying but it stresses the consequent overloading rather than the extinction of appetite or desire; often it also suggests the stimulation of a greed that knows no limits except those imposed upon it by physical necessity
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its hunger was already all but glutted, and its purpose seemed to be, mainly, to kill—C. G. D. Roberts

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Glut may be used also in reference to impersonal things, implying merely an overloading, and carrying no suggestion of greed or satiation
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banks glutted with unpaid commercial paper— Lehrman

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Gorge usually implies the stimulation of greed but it distinctively suggests a glutting to the point almost of choking or bursting; the term therefore often implies the frustration rather than the satisfying of that greed
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gorge oneself with chocolate

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Dick fell upon eggs and bacon and gorged till he could gorge no more— Kipling

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heaven can gorge us with our own desires— Defoe

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Analogous words: *satisfy, content: pamper, humor, *indulge: gratify, regale (see PLEASE)

New Dictionary of Synonyms. 2014.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Satiate — Sa ti*ate, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Satiated}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Satiating}.] 1. To satisfy the appetite or desire of; to feed to the full; to furnish enjoyment to, to the extent of desire; to sate; as, to satiate appetite or sense. [1913 Webster]… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • satiate — [sā′shē āt΄; ] for adj., usually [, sā′shēit] adj. [L satiatus, pp. of satiare, to fill full, satisfy < satis, enough: see SAD] having had enough or more than enough; sated vt. satiated, satiating 1. Now Rare to satisfy to the full; gratify… …   English World dictionary

  • Satiate — Sa ti*ate, a. [L. satiatus, p. p. of satiare to satisfy, from sat, satis, enough. See {Sad}, a., and cf. {Sate}.] Filled to satiety; glutted; sated; followed by with or of. Satiate of applause. Pope. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • satiate — index assuage, pacify, satisfy (fulfill) Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …   Law dictionary

  • satiate — (v.) mid 15c., from L. satiatus, pp. of satiare fill full, satisfy, from satis enough, from PIE root *sa to satisfy (Cf. Goth. saþs satiated, O.E. sæd satisfied; see SAD (Cf. sad)). Related: Satiated; …   Etymology dictionary

  • satiate — [v] stuff, satisfy completely or excessively cloy, content, feed to gills*, fill, glut, gorge, gratify, indulge, jade, nauseate, overdose, overfill, pall, sate, saturate, slake, surfeit; concepts 169,740 Ant. deprive, dissatisfy, leave wanting …   New thesaurus

  • Satiate — For a definition of the word satiate , see the Wiktionary entry satiate. Satiate Studio album by Avail Releas …   Wikipedia

  • satiate — UK [ˈseɪʃɪeɪt] / US [ˈseɪʃɪˌeɪt] verb [transitive] Word forms satiate : present tense I/you/we/they satiate he/she/it satiates present participle satiating past tense satiated past participle satiated literary to satisfy a need or desire… …   English dictionary

  • satiate — I. adjective Date: 15th century filled to satiety II. transitive verb ( ated; ating) Etymology: Latin satiatus, past participle of satiare, from satis enough more at sad Date: 15th century to satisfy (as a need or desire) fully or to excess •… …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • satiate — I (New American Roget s College Thesaurus) v. sate, satisfy; cloy, jade, make blasé; quench, slake, pall; glut, gorge, surfeit, bore; spoil. See sufficiency. Ant., leave wanting, disappoint. II (Roget s IV) v. Syn. sate, surfeit, cloy, glut, fill …   English dictionary for students

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